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Weight Loss

With information on research, testing and appointments

Obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes are all on the rise.

Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Australia; increasing at a faster rate than other chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. All types of diabetes are increasing in prevalence:

  • Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10% of all diabetes and is increasing
  • Type 2 diabetes accounts for 85% of all diabetes and is increasing
  • Gestational diabetes in pregnancy is increasing (ref Diabetes Australia)

We all know this is happening but what we do not know is why?

We are no longer hunters and gatherers we have swapped them for play stations, mobile phones, iPads, computers and a sedentary desk job.

Our food sources do not contain enough quality protein and fibre instead a quick fix carb meal when late from the office or a 30 minute lunch break consists of pot noodles, microwave macaroni or even worse – burgers and fries!

Children and Excess Weight

Our children spend hours on their play stations, watching t.v. or surfing the net on their own mobile phone instead of getting outdoors enjoying nature and sunshine.  A staggering percentage of infants at the age of two years know how to navigate an iPad!!!  How easy is it to swipe up, left or right?

Statistics show now that the average age of a person at risk for developing diabetes is 40.  Diabetes used to be an ‘old persons disease’ not any more.

If you are worried that your children might be carrying unnecessary weight then look to their lifestyle are they getting out and about and playing, running around and what kind of foods are they eating?  Watch the snacks not only from a calorie point of view but also from an allergy point of view.  When a child suffers with food intolerances/sensitivities they are not easy to pinpoint. The underlying causes of weight gain manifest from inflammation from the gut.  If allergies are present so is inflammation.

This leads us on to our next topic excess weight gain and how is it connected to Food Intolerance (IgG).

How is Excess Weight connected to IgG Food Intolerances ?

The relationship between obesity and IgG

An IgG food allergy may intensify such inflammatory processes by the production of messenger proteins like TNF-alpha. (a messenger substance which blocks the receptors for insulin). This action impedes the cell’s energy supply. The blood sugar present in the blood cannot be transported into the cell for energy. The liver transforms the blood sugar into fatty acids which are then deposited into the fat cells.

The blockage of the insulin receptors results in more insulin being released and therefore increases the insulin concentration which inhibits the reconversion of fatty acids into blood sugar.

Energy consumption decreases as the individual cells have less energy at their disposal, cell activity is reduced, the basal metabolic rate slows down and the quantity of calories used at rest diminishes.

The identification of foodstuffs that may trigger inflammatory conditions could offer a good possibility to exert a positive influence on the inflammation process through a corresponding change in diet.

IgG seems to be the best indicator for identifying a food as being pro-inflammatory. Every time a food comes in contact with a corresponding IgG antibody, an inflammatory response is launched.

What some studies have shown

Studies have shown that an IgG guided diet has a positive effect on weight loss and stabilisation of glucose metabolism.

For example, the study “IgG antibodies against food antigens are correlated with inflammation and intima media thickness in obese juveniles” (Wilders-Truschnig et al. ECED published online 2007; DOI 10.1055/s-2007-993165) showed a significant correlation between obesity, elevated IgG antibodies and inflammation. Thus, elevated IgG levels for food could be involved in the development of excess weight.

Increased weight and obesity are believed to be another cause in the development of food sensitivities.  Inflammation as a result of obesity or increased weight contributes to increased intestinal lining permeability, thereby potentially elevating levels of the IgG antibodies to foods in the blood stream (Neuendorf et al. 21019)

If you are concerned that you may have underlying allergies then we offer numerous allergy tests for you to choose from.

Click here to go to our testing page.

Testing Options

What if a person or a child is suffering from a food allergy or intolerance?  

Not so easy to understand and pinpoint!  Food sensitivities are known to create inflammation, water weight gain commonly known as fluid retention there are many reasons which can trigger inflammation and lead to permeability of the gut wall lining which then allows foodstuffs, viruses and bacteria to seep through creating predominantly IgG immune responses.

It is fair to say that obesity is one of the fastest growing chronic diseases and still it continues to rise. Obesity and diabetes will impact on our health and that of our children and it is  becoming already a major contributor in the development of many health conditions such as CVD (cardiovascular disease), diabetes, fatty liver, insulin resistance, oestrogen dominant cancers.  Obesity and cardiovascular disease are well and truly on our radar.

Many people base their resolutions and goals around weight loss and dietary management.  We now know that no single diet is suitable for all  With the wide variety of diets claiming weight loss and health benefits, it’s easy to dismiss the fact that foods within these diets may be causing more harm than good specific to each individual’s food sensitivities.

One useful approach to managing weight gain/obesity is to eliminate foods that are IgG reactive and replace them with similar, non-reactive foods.

This process will ensure that inflammation is kept to a minimum and that nutrient deficiencies do not occur (Lewis et al 2012).

Higher in Chemicals
(In order of Highest Chemical content)

  • Apples
  • Strawberries
  • Grapes
  • Celery
  • Peaches
  • Spinach
  • Capsicum
  • Nectarines
  • Cucumbers
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Snap Peas
  • Potatoes
Lower in Chemicals
(In order of Lowest Chemical content)

  • Avocados
  • Sweet Corn
  • Pineapple
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet Peas (frozen)
  • Onions
  • Asparagus
  • Mangoes
  • Paw Paw
  • Kiwi Fruit
  • Eggplant
  • Grapefruit
  • Rockmelon
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet Potato

Eating Organic Foods

The point remains that we simply don’t know yet what the long-term effects of all the additives and unnatural chemicals is food. This makes many people choose to do what they can now, rather than wait – one of these choices is to eat organically to try to limit their chemical exposure.

What to Look for When Buying Organic

According to the National Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Australia (NASAA) it is important to look for the term ‘certified organic’ on your items, as this can only be used by those who are actually producing what you are really looking for.

But it’s more than avoiding the pesticides; organic foods are typically made without synthetic colourings, preservatives, additives or genetically modified ingredients, so there is a bigger picture here to understand especially when it comes to allergy sufferers.

Eating an organic diet is only half the picture.

Organic foods can still cause inflammatory conditions within the gut unless you have identified which foods evoke an IgG pro-inflammatory response.

Tips If You Cannot Afford to Go Organic?

It’s true that going organic has a cost (some say it’s the true cost of food production) so if you cannot stretch to going all organic – you can still make some smarter choices based on those foods likely to contain higher levels of chemicals than others.

You can also:-

  • wash conventionally grown produce as soon as you purchase it
  • use a fruit and veggie wash to help break down the waxes and pesticide residues
  • fruit and veggie wash helps to reduce bacterial contamination
  • buy from local farmers markets
  • buy foods in season
  • choose foods lower in chemical content – see table in the next panel

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Dairy-free cheesecake! Just as tasty as the original, this creamy and satisfying cheesecake is a great alternative if you are avoiding dairy/lactose!⁠
What you need....⁠
300 g cashew nuts⁠
�2 tablespoons desiccated coconut ⁠
200 g medjool dates, pitted�⁠
150 g almonds�⁠
100 g blanched hazelnuts⁠
�Juice of 4 lemons�⁠
250 ml runny honey⁠
�165 ml coconut oil�⁠
1tsp vanilla extract�⁠
Method⁠
 1. Place the cashews in a bowl, cover with cold water, then set aside to soak for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight. ⁠
2. Grease a 20cm spring form cake tin, sprinkle in the desiccated coconut, then give the tin a good shake so that it's evenly distributed. ⁠
3. Place the dates in a bowl, cover with warm water, then leave to soak for around 10 minutes. Drain and add to a food processor with the almonds and hazelnuts, then blitz to a chunky crumb consistency. Spoon the mixture into the prepared cake tin, patting and smoothing it out evenly with wet hands. ⁠
4. Give the food processor bowl a quick rinse, then drain and add the cashews, lemon juice, honey, vanilla and coconut oil. Blitz until smooth and combined, and add more honey to taste.⁠
5. Carefully pour the cashew mixture on top of the crumb base, smoothing it out evenly. Gently tap tin on a work surface to get rid of any bubbles. Pop in the freezer for around 2 hours, or until set. ⁠
6. When ready to eat, allow cheesecake to thaw slightly before serving. Enjoy!⁠

Dairy-free cheesecake! Just as tasty as the original, this creamy and satisfying cheesecake is a great alternative if you are avoiding dairy/lactose!⁠
What you need....⁠
300 g cashew nuts⁠
�2 tablespoons desiccated coconut ⁠
200 g medjool dates, pitted�⁠
150 g almonds�⁠
100 g blanched hazelnuts⁠
�Juice of 4 lemons�⁠
250 ml runny honey⁠
�165 ml coconut oil�⁠
1tsp vanilla extract�⁠
Method⁠
1. Place the cashews in a bowl, cover with cold water, then set aside to soak for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight. ⁠
2. Grease a 20cm spring form cake tin, sprinkle in the desiccated coconut, then give the tin a good shake so that it's evenly distributed. ⁠
3. Place the dates in a bowl, cover with warm water, then leave to soak for around 10 minutes. Drain and add to a food processor with the almonds and hazelnuts, then blitz to a chunky crumb consistency. Spoon the mixture into the prepared cake tin, patting and smoothing it out evenly with wet hands. ⁠
4. Give the food processor bowl a quick rinse, then drain and add the cashews, lemon juice, honey, vanilla and coconut oil. Blitz until smooth and combined, and add more honey to taste.⁠
5. Carefully pour the cashew mixture on top of the crumb base, smoothing it out evenly. Gently tap tin on a work surface to get rid of any bubbles. Pop in the freezer for around 2 hours, or until set. ⁠
6. When ready to eat, allow cheesecake to thaw slightly before serving. Enjoy!⁠
...

The Low Down on Lactose and Dairy….

The term lactose intolerance is so common now, every second person is having their coffee with almond, soy or oat milk!

BUT there is a common misconception around lactose intolerance and dairy- lactose free does not equal dairy free! Often people who have been diagnosed lactose intolerant will unnecessarily avoid all dairy. In fact, cheese such as feta, cheddar and brie contain almost no lactose whatsoever!

So what does lactose intolerance really mean, and how does it differ from a dairy allergy?

Lactose is a type of sugar commonly found in dairy products. It os broken down in the digestive system by an enzyme called Lactase. If there is not enough lactase produced, this can result in symptoms like stomach cramps, bloating, gas or diarrhoea. 

Some people DO have a dairy allergy caused by an immune response and must strictly avoid all dairy products. However, people with a lactose intolerance will often be able to tolerate small amounts of lactose with no adverse effects. 

If you think this might be you, by working with an experienced health practitioner you can safely assess your tolerance level and manage symptoms long-term, without eliminating your favourite dairy treat!

The Low Down on Lactose and Dairy….

The term lactose intolerance is so common now, every second person is having their coffee with almond, soy or oat milk!

BUT there is a common misconception around lactose intolerance and dairy- lactose free does not equal dairy free! Often people who have been diagnosed lactose intolerant will unnecessarily avoid all dairy. In fact, cheese such as feta, cheddar and brie contain almost no lactose whatsoever!

So what does lactose intolerance really mean, and how does it differ from a dairy allergy?

Lactose is a type of sugar commonly found in dairy products. It os broken down in the digestive system by an enzyme called Lactase. If there is not enough lactase produced, this can result in symptoms like stomach cramps, bloating, gas or diarrhoea.

Some people DO have a dairy allergy caused by an immune response and must strictly avoid all dairy products. However, people with a lactose intolerance will often be able to tolerate small amounts of lactose with no adverse effects.

If you think this might be you, by working with an experienced health practitioner you can safely assess your tolerance level and manage symptoms long-term, without eliminating your favourite dairy treat!
...

Bursting the Bubble on Sugar Free Gum!⁠
⁠
When bowel problems strike, you usually take great care choosing foods that are good for you, because irritating your gut can have painful consequences. However, something you might not even think about chewing gum could be the source of your tummy troubles.⁠
⁠
Many “sugar-free” products such as chewing gum and sweets contain a sweetener called sorbitol. It is a sugar alcohol and part of the FODMAP family.⁠
⁠
Only relatively small amounts of sorbitol (5 to 20g) are needed to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as stomach cramps, bloating and gas. Higher doses (20-50g) are linked to malabsorption of nutrients, malnutrition, and substantial weight loss.⁠
⁠
A typical piece of gum contains about 1.25 grams of sorbitol so you can see that consuming greater than 5 pieces a day can easily cause gastrointestinal upset. ⁠
⁠
Mums, it is important to be cautious when providing gum and candies containing alcohol-sugars to children, who might unknowingly over-consume these products and might not be expressing their tummy upsets clearly.⁠
⁠
Products containing sorbitol do carry a warning that excessive ingestion may cause minor digestive side effects, but the authors of the BMJ article state that excessive use could cause chronic diarrhoea and malabsorption.⁠
⁠
So the next time you are in the supermarket queue waiting to go through the check out and you see an array of “sugar free” gum be sure to give them a wide berth.⁠
⁠
Journal reference: British Medical Journal (DOI: 10.1136/bmj.39280.657350.BE)⁠

Bursting the Bubble on Sugar Free Gum!⁠

When bowel problems strike, you usually take great care choosing foods that are good for you, because irritating your gut can have painful consequences. However, something you might not even think about chewing gum could be the source of your tummy troubles.⁠

Many “sugar-free” products such as chewing gum and sweets contain a sweetener called sorbitol. It is a sugar alcohol and part of the FODMAP family.⁠

Only relatively small amounts of sorbitol (5 to 20g) are needed to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as stomach cramps, bloating and gas. Higher doses (20-50g) are linked to malabsorption of nutrients, malnutrition, and substantial weight loss.⁠

A typical piece of gum contains about 1.25 grams of sorbitol so you can see that consuming greater than 5 pieces a day can easily cause gastrointestinal upset. ⁠

Mums, it is important to be cautious when providing gum and candies containing alcohol-sugars to children, who might unknowingly over-consume these products and might not be expressing their tummy upsets clearly.⁠

Products containing sorbitol do carry a warning that excessive ingestion may cause minor digestive side effects, but the authors of the BMJ article state that excessive use could cause chronic diarrhoea and malabsorption.⁠

So the next time you are in the supermarket queue waiting to go through the check out and you see an array of “sugar free” gum be sure to give them a wide berth.⁠

Journal reference: British Medical Journal (DOI: 10.1136/bmj.39280.657350.BE)⁠
...

The two main polyols are called Sorbitol and Manitol and they are sugar alcohols. They occur naturally in a wide range of fruit and vegetables. ⁠
⁠
Polyols can also be manmade and are often sneaked into manufactured goods such as hard candies, toffees, ice cream, jams, preserves, chewing gum, chocolates, protein powders, baked goods, nutritional supplements, diabetic supplements, cough drops and throat lozenges.  Yes quite a lot of things really, this is why it is so important to understand the names or the numbers so as to avoid these sneaky FODMAPs. ⁠
⁠
Why?⁠
⁠
Unfortunately sugar alcohols like to upset our digestive systems and can cause unpleasant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms (IBS). Only one-third of the polyols consumed are actually absorbed by our bodies, and the level of absorption depends on the type of polyol and the individual. When polyols are poorly absorbed, they become fodder for our gut bacteria, who feast on the sugars and rapidly ferment them, triggering abdominal bloating, lots of gas, cramping and diarrhoea.⁠
⁠
The level of IBS you experience all depends on how much is consumed and what each person’s tolerance level is – it’s a complex and confusing problem! ⁠
⁠
Our Nutritionists at Perth Allergy Clinic have both completed the FODMAP course at Monash Uni and can help guide you through the minefield of these sneaky FODMAPs.  We offer testing of all FODMAPs, once we have your baseline report we can organise an elimination and reintroduction program, understand your personal tolerance levels to get you back to enjoying your sweet treats!⁠
⁠
And remember …..⁠
⁠
While on the low FODMAP diet there are six polyols you should look out for: sorbitol (420), mannitol (421), maltitol (965), xylitol (967), isomalt (953), and lactitol (966). ⁠

The two main polyols are called Sorbitol and Manitol and they are sugar alcohols. They occur naturally in a wide range of fruit and vegetables. ⁠

Polyols can also be manmade and are often sneaked into manufactured goods such as hard candies, toffees, ice cream, jams, preserves, chewing gum, chocolates, protein powders, baked goods, nutritional supplements, diabetic supplements, cough drops and throat lozenges. Yes quite a lot of things really, this is why it is so important to understand the names or the numbers so as to avoid these sneaky FODMAPs. ⁠

Why?⁠

Unfortunately sugar alcohols like to upset our digestive systems and can cause unpleasant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms (IBS). Only one-third of the polyols consumed are actually absorbed by our bodies, and the level of absorption depends on the type of polyol and the individual. When polyols are poorly absorbed, they become fodder for our gut bacteria, who feast on the sugars and rapidly ferment them, triggering abdominal bloating, lots of gas, cramping and diarrhoea.⁠

The level of IBS you experience all depends on how much is consumed and what each person’s tolerance level is – it’s a complex and confusing problem! ⁠

Our Nutritionists at Perth Allergy Clinic have both completed the FODMAP course at Monash Uni and can help guide you through the minefield of these sneaky FODMAPs. We offer testing of all FODMAPs, once we have your baseline report we can organise an elimination and reintroduction program, understand your personal tolerance levels to get you back to enjoying your sweet treats!⁠

And remember …..⁠

While on the low FODMAP diet there are six polyols you should look out for: sorbitol (420), mannitol (421), maltitol (965), xylitol (967), isomalt (953), and lactitol (966). ⁠
...

Low Fructose lemon drizzle cake⁠! 🍋 🍰⁠
⁠
If you are following a FODMAP protocol, it can be challenging to find 'safe' alternatives to your favourites - this lemon cake is low in fructose, moist and tangy, and will definitely hit that sweet spot!⁠ 😋⁠
⁠
What you need ...⁠
⁠
•1 cup almond meal.⁠
•1/4 cup coconut flour.⁠
•1/2 cup milk of your choice.⁠
•3 eggs, separated.⁠
•1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil (mild in flavour).⁠
•Juice and rind of two lemons ⁠
•1 tablespoon rice malt syrup (or to taste).⁠
•1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste.⁠
•1 teaspoon baking soda.⁠
Lemon sauce⁠
•1/2 cup coconut cream⁠
•1 teaspoon rice malt syrup.⁠
•1 tablespoon lemon juice.⁠
⁠
Directions ..⁠
⁠
1. Preheat oven to 160C and grease a 20cm round cake tin. ⁠
2. Mix together egg yolks, rice malt syrup, vanilla bean paste, lemon juice, lemon rind, olive oil and milk. Add almond meal, coconut flour, baking soda and mix thoroughly.⁠
3. With electric mixers, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks and fold them into the lemon mixture. Pour into your cake tin and bake for 30 minutes or until the cake is firm and spongy in the centre.⁠
For the lemon sauce:⁠
4. Warm the coconut cream in a small saucepan. Add lemon juice and rice malt syrup and stir. Drizzle over lemon cake. ⁠
⁠
Enjoy!⁠

Low Fructose lemon drizzle cake⁠! 🍋 🍰⁠

If you are following a FODMAP protocol, it can be challenging to find 'safe' alternatives to your favourites - this lemon cake is low in fructose, moist and tangy, and will definitely hit that sweet spot!⁠ 😋⁠

What you need ...⁠

•1 cup almond meal.⁠
•1/4 cup coconut flour.⁠
•1/2 cup milk of your choice.⁠
•3 eggs, separated.⁠
•1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil (mild in flavour).⁠
•Juice and rind of two lemons ⁠
•1 tablespoon rice malt syrup (or to taste).⁠
•1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste.⁠
•1 teaspoon baking soda.⁠
Lemon sauce⁠
•1/2 cup coconut cream⁠
•1 teaspoon rice malt syrup.⁠
•1 tablespoon lemon juice.⁠

Directions ..⁠

1. Preheat oven to 160C and grease a 20cm round cake tin. ⁠
2. Mix together egg yolks, rice malt syrup, vanilla bean paste, lemon juice, lemon rind, olive oil and milk. Add almond meal, coconut flour, baking soda and mix thoroughly.⁠
3. With electric mixers, beat the egg whites until they form stiff peaks and fold them into the lemon mixture. Pour into your cake tin and bake for 30 minutes or until the cake is firm and spongy in the centre.⁠
For the lemon sauce:⁠
4. Warm the coconut cream in a small saucepan. Add lemon juice and rice malt syrup and stir. Drizzle over lemon cake. ⁠

Enjoy!⁠
...

You may be wondering how does a fructose malabsorption develop? ⁠
⁠
As with all FODMAPs, the issue comes when the fructose isn’t completely absorbed in the small intestine, and so ferments in the large intestine causing excess gas, stomach pain, bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation. ⁠
⁠
Factors that contribute to developing a fructose malabsorption are:-⁠
⁠
Undiagnosed food intolerances⁠
Continuing to ignore IBS symptoms⁠
Eating too many high fructose foods⁠
Consuming drinks high in fructose eg juices, soft drinks⁠
Stress⁠
Intestinal hyper permeability (aka leaky gut)⁠
Eating disorders⁠
Poor gut health ⁠
Antibiotics⁠
⁠
You may have had a fructose malabsorption gut problem for many years and have just put up with it not realising that your symptoms are from fructose until one day you decide to become healthier ditch the coffee and start to juice lots of fruits and that’s the day you notice that your tummy bloat is related to your 'healthy juice'! ⁠
⁠
The good news is that we can test for fructose malabsorption with a simple breath test.  Results in a week to 10 days.  If your results are positive we have our Clinical Nutritionists on hand to help you resolve any digestive issues quickly and effectively and get back to enjoying your food!⁠

You may be wondering how does a fructose malabsorption develop? ⁠

As with all FODMAPs, the issue comes when the fructose isn’t completely absorbed in the small intestine, and so ferments in the large intestine causing excess gas, stomach pain, bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation. ⁠

Factors that contribute to developing a fructose malabsorption are:-⁠

Undiagnosed food intolerances⁠
Continuing to ignore IBS symptoms⁠
Eating too many high fructose foods⁠
Consuming drinks high in fructose eg juices, soft drinks⁠
Stress⁠
Intestinal hyper permeability (aka leaky gut)⁠
Eating disorders⁠
Poor gut health ⁠
Antibiotics⁠

You may have had a fructose malabsorption gut problem for many years and have just put up with it not realising that your symptoms are from fructose until one day you decide to become healthier ditch the coffee and start to juice lots of fruits and that’s the day you notice that your tummy bloat is related to your 'healthy juice'! ⁠

The good news is that we can test for fructose malabsorption with a simple breath test. Results in a week to 10 days. If your results are positive we have our Clinical Nutritionists on hand to help you resolve any digestive issues quickly and effectively and get back to enjoying your food!⁠
...

⁠
Good news for those of us who struggle with unexplained digestive discomfort, such as bloating, gas, stomach pain, cramping, constipation and/or diarrhoea.⁠
⁠
Not sure what it could be?⁠
⁠
FODMAPs⁠ or SIBO?⁠
⁠
We now can offer hydrogen/methane breath tests which are highly specific and sensitive tools for the diagnosis of FODMAP malabsorption and/or the investigation of SIBO.⁠ Read more on these in future posts!⁠
⁠
FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. These are a collection of short-chain carbohydrates that when not effectively broken down in the upper digestive tract can lead to bacterial fermentation in the low digestive tract. ⁠
⁠
Fructose⁠
Lactose⁠
Sorbitol⁠
Sucrose⁠
Manitol⁠
⁠
SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth)⁠
⁠Lactulose⁠
Glucose⁠
⁠
These tests are first line interventions in the diagnostic workup of IBS symptoms. ⁠
⁠
Convenient home breath test kits are available and can be performed at work or in the privacy of your own home.  A great option for busy people who cannot attend our clinic.⁠
⁠
Once you receive your results our Clinical Nutritionists are available to assist you with any dietary requirements you may need.  Jennifer and Holly between them hold Bachelor, Master’s and FODMAPs Cert (Monash)⁠
⁠
See you in clinic or we can mail a test to you!⁠
⁠
Prices start from $175⁠ ⁠
⁠
Health fund rebates may apply⁠


Good news for those of us who struggle with unexplained digestive discomfort, such as bloating, gas, stomach pain, cramping, constipation and/or diarrhoea.⁠

Not sure what it could be?⁠

FODMAPs⁠ or SIBO?⁠

We now can offer hydrogen/methane breath tests which are highly specific and sensitive tools for the diagnosis of FODMAP malabsorption and/or the investigation of SIBO.⁠ Read more on these in future posts!⁠

FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. These are a collection of short-chain carbohydrates that when not effectively broken down in the upper digestive tract can lead to bacterial fermentation in the low digestive tract. ⁠

Fructose⁠
Lactose⁠
Sorbitol⁠
Sucrose⁠
Manitol⁠

SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth)⁠
⁠Lactulose⁠
Glucose⁠

These tests are first line interventions in the diagnostic workup of IBS symptoms. ⁠

Convenient home breath test kits are available and can be performed at work or in the privacy of your own home. A great option for busy people who cannot attend our clinic.⁠

Once you receive your results our Clinical Nutritionists are available to assist you with any dietary requirements you may need. Jennifer and Holly between them hold Bachelor, Master’s and FODMAPs Cert (Monash)⁠

See you in clinic or we can mail a test to you!⁠

Prices start from $175⁠ ⁠

Health fund rebates may apply⁠
...

Do you have a fear of flying, heights, public speaking, storms or needles?⁠
⁠
Did you know that our Kinesiologist Jennifer has a very specific procedure for helping to address any fear and phobias that you might have?⁠
⁠
Using muscle monitoring, kinesiology can access fear-based beliefs that have been stored in your body, subconscious mind or nervous system for over a period of time and with the knowledge and use of a few corrections can help ease these beliefs and worries from your life. ⁠
⁠
Take advantage of our Kinesiology special ‘Balance for Fears and Phobias’ for the months of November and December normally $110 now $90.

Do you have a fear of flying, heights, public speaking, storms or needles?⁠

Did you know that our Kinesiologist Jennifer has a very specific procedure for helping to address any fear and phobias that you might have?⁠

Using muscle monitoring, kinesiology can access fear-based beliefs that have been stored in your body, subconscious mind or nervous system for over a period of time and with the knowledge and use of a few corrections can help ease these beliefs and worries from your life. ⁠

Take advantage of our Kinesiology special ‘Balance for Fears and Phobias’ for the months of November and December normally $110 now $90.
...

Our Clinical Nutritionist Jennifer shares a yummy pumpkin recipe 🎃 ⁠
⁠
Pumpkin is a very nutritious vegetable (although technically it is a fruit as it contains seeds). It is rich in vitamin A and antioxidants.⁠
⁠
If you have left over carved pumpkin from Halloween and don't quite no what to do with it, don’t waste the pumpkin, follow this easy recipe that kids will enjoy as well.⁠
⁠
Pumpkin Quinoa balls⁠
• 1/2 pumpkin (diced)⁠
• 1 tbs olive oil⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground cumin⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground coriander⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg⁠
• 1/2 cup quinoa⁠
• 1 cup broccoli (broken into florets)⁠
• 1 red onion (finely sliced)⁠
⁠
1. Preheat the oven to 180°C and line 2 baking trays.⁠
⁠
2. Put the pumpkin into a bowl, add the olive oil and spices and toss to coat.⁠
⁠
3. Arrange the pumpkin in a single layer on a lined tray and bake, turning halfway through cooking, for 25 minutes or until soft. Remove from the oven and set aside until cool enough to handle.⁠
⁠
4. Meanwhile, cook the quinoa (I find the best way to cook quinoa is to rinse it with water first and then add to a saucepan with double the amount of water and cook for about 10 – 15 minutes until water is absorbed. Cover the pan, remove from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes and then fluff it up with a fork.⁠
⁠
5. Bring another small saucepan of water to the boil. Add the broccoli and cook for 2 minutes or until tender. Drain well.⁠
⁠
6. Place the pumpkin in a bowl. Squeeze the liquid from the grated onion and use a paper towel to pat the onion dry. Add the onion, broccoli and quinoa to the pumpkin and mash together until well combined. Dollop teaspoon-sized balls of mixture onto the other lined tray.⁠
⁠
7. Bake the balls, turning halfway through cooking, for 30 minutes or until golden brown. ⁠
⁠
Enjoy!⁠

Our Clinical Nutritionist Jennifer shares a yummy pumpkin recipe 🎃 ⁠

Pumpkin is a very nutritious vegetable (although technically it is a fruit as it contains seeds). It is rich in vitamin A and antioxidants.⁠

If you have left over carved pumpkin from Halloween and don't quite no what to do with it, don’t waste the pumpkin, follow this easy recipe that kids will enjoy as well.⁠

Pumpkin Quinoa balls⁠
• 1/2 pumpkin (diced)⁠
• 1 tbs olive oil⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground cumin⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground coriander⁠
• 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg⁠
• 1/2 cup quinoa⁠
• 1 cup broccoli (broken into florets)⁠
• 1 red onion (finely sliced)⁠

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C and line 2 baking trays.⁠

2. Put the pumpkin into a bowl, add the olive oil and spices and toss to coat.⁠

3. Arrange the pumpkin in a single layer on a lined tray and bake, turning halfway through cooking, for 25 minutes or until soft. Remove from the oven and set aside until cool enough to handle.⁠

4. Meanwhile, cook the quinoa (I find the best way to cook quinoa is to rinse it with water first and then add to a saucepan with double the amount of water and cook for about 10 – 15 minutes until water is absorbed. Cover the pan, remove from the heat and let it sit for 5 minutes and then fluff it up with a fork.⁠

5. Bring another small saucepan of water to the boil. Add the broccoli and cook for 2 minutes or until tender. Drain well.⁠

6. Place the pumpkin in a bowl. Squeeze the liquid from the grated onion and use a paper towel to pat the onion dry. Add the onion, broccoli and quinoa to the pumpkin and mash together until well combined. Dollop teaspoon-sized balls of mixture onto the other lined tray.⁠

7. Bake the balls, turning halfway through cooking, for 30 minutes or until golden brown. ⁠

Enjoy!⁠
...

Pumpkins are one of the more resilient fruits, they find ways to grow large and bulging in sparse soil and share nutrients along a straggly connected vine that reaches into the ground for replenishment.⁠
⁠
Apart from the fun of using the pumpkin for Halloween to make scary face lanterns; when you have carved your masterpiece you can use the seeds to get a great source of zinc.⁠
⁠
A yummy way to enjoy the seeds is to dry roast them! ⁠
⁠
Pumpkins are a symbol of prosperity, growth, abundance and health.⁠
⁠
Tune in for healthy pumpkin recipe created by our Clinical Nutritionist Jennifer next week. 👻🎃

Pumpkins are one of the more resilient fruits, they find ways to grow large and bulging in sparse soil and share nutrients along a straggly connected vine that reaches into the ground for replenishment.⁠

Apart from the fun of using the pumpkin for Halloween to make scary face lanterns; when you have carved your masterpiece you can use the seeds to get a great source of zinc.⁠

A yummy way to enjoy the seeds is to dry roast them! ⁠

Pumpkins are a symbol of prosperity, growth, abundance and health.⁠

Tune in for healthy pumpkin recipe created by our Clinical Nutritionist Jennifer next week. 👻🎃
...

Post-nasal drip is among the most common causes of persistent cough, hoarseness, sore throat and other annoying symptoms. ⁠
⁠
It's a common diagnosis and can be caused by a number of reasons which may linger for weeks or even months...⁠
⁠
Reason may include: ⁠
⁠
-Allergies⁠
-Viral infections (including the common cold)⁠
-Sinus infection⁠
-Irritants in the air (such as fumes or dust)⁠
⁠
The good news is that most of the causes can be quickly identified and most will improve with treatment. ⁠
⁠
There are a number of treatment options, including home remedies on how to avoid and relieve postnasal drip:.⁠
⁠
💧Drink plenty of fluids ⁠
Keeping well hydrated will help thin the mucus in the throat.⁠
⁠
🙅‍♂️☕🍺Avoid Caffeine and Alcohol⁠
Alcohol and caffeinated drinks may cause further dehydration (and, as discussed above, fluids are integral to thinning mucus in the body). Not only that but caffeine and alcohol are both inflammatory and could add to your discomfort or contribute to gastroesophageal reflux, which can further contribute to mucus in the throat.⁠
⁠
🍋Load Up on Vitamin C⁠
Vitamin C is known for its antibacterial and antiviral properties. We suggest squeezing half a lemon in warm water and adding honey to taste. ⁠
⁠
🍵Chicken Soup and Tea⁠
If you've been told that chicken soup helps with post-nasal drip (or other symptoms of a cold or flu), it's true! But it doesn't actually have to be chicken soup - any hot liquid can help thin the mucus and help you maintain hydration. ⁠
⁠
🛁Get Steamy⁠
Using a vaporiser or humidifier can increase the moisture level in your house, which helps decrease mucus formation, allowing you to breathe easier. A long, hot shower (in which you inhale the steam) can work wonders as well.⁠
⁠
🌡Get an Allergy Test⁠
Just because you're noticing a lot of mucus in your throat, doesn't necessarily mean you're suffering from postnasal drip. In fact, it might just mean you have an allergy to dust, pollen, or even certain foods. ⁠
⁠
Contact us to learn more about allergy testing and how we can support you through the season!⁠ 💛⁠

Post-nasal drip is among the most common causes of persistent cough, hoarseness, sore throat and other annoying symptoms. ⁠

It's a common diagnosis and can be caused by a number of reasons which may linger for weeks or even months...⁠

Reason may include: ⁠

-Allergies⁠
-Viral infections (including the common cold)⁠
-Sinus infection⁠
-Irritants in the air (such as fumes or dust)⁠

The good news is that most of the causes can be quickly identified and most will improve with treatment. ⁠

There are a number of treatment options, including home remedies on how to avoid and relieve postnasal drip:.⁠

💧Drink plenty of fluids ⁠
Keeping well hydrated will help thin the mucus in the throat.⁠

🙅‍♂️☕🍺Avoid Caffeine and Alcohol⁠
Alcohol and caffeinated drinks may cause further dehydration (and, as discussed above, fluids are integral to thinning mucus in the body). Not only that but caffeine and alcohol are both inflammatory and could add to your discomfort or contribute to gastroesophageal reflux, which can further contribute to mucus in the throat.⁠

🍋Load Up on Vitamin C⁠
Vitamin C is known for its antibacterial and antiviral properties. We suggest squeezing half a lemon in warm water and adding honey to taste. ⁠

🍵Chicken Soup and Tea⁠
If you've been told that chicken soup helps with post-nasal drip (or other symptoms of a cold or flu), it's true! But it doesn't actually have to be chicken soup - any hot liquid can help thin the mucus and help you maintain hydration. ⁠

🛁Get Steamy⁠
Using a vaporiser or humidifier can increase the moisture level in your house, which helps decrease mucus formation, allowing you to breathe easier. A long, hot shower (in which you inhale the steam) can work wonders as well.⁠

🌡Get an Allergy Test⁠
Just because you're noticing a lot of mucus in your throat, doesn't necessarily mean you're suffering from postnasal drip. In fact, it might just mean you have an allergy to dust, pollen, or even certain foods. ⁠

Contact us to learn more about allergy testing and how we can support you through the season!⁠ 💛⁠
...

If you've ever had a cold that just wouldn't go away, chances are it was sinusitis - an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, the cavities within the bones that surround the nose. ⁠
⁠
The sinuses are lined with a thin membrane that produces mucus, which is normally swept along by hair cells and drains through small openings into the nasal cavity. Sinusitis (also called rhinosinusitis) starts when this drainage system becomes blocked, usually from swelling due to inflammation caused by infection or allergy. Soon, your head hurts, you feel facial pressure or pain, and thick mucus clogs your nose. The symptoms may clear on their own, but often they persist or repeatedly return.⁠
⁠
There are many things you can do to reduce your chance of developing sinusitis or to relieve early sinusitis symptoms. 🤧⁠
⁠
One of the most important is to promote drainage and keep nasal passages clear. ⁠
⁠
Here are some suggestions:⁠
⁠
🛁Bathe your nasal passages daily. Run water gently into the nasal passages to help clear excess mucus and moisten membranes. Good times to do it are in the morning and at night⁠
⁠
💧Drink lots of water. Good hydration helps keep the mucus thin and loose. Have a bottle of water at your desk at work or put a glass near the kitchen sink to remind you to drink water throughout the day.⁠
⁠
🧖‍♀️Inhale steam. Linger in a hot shower. Or bring water to a boil and pour it into a pan; place a towel over your head, and carefully bend over the pan to inhale the steam. To avoid burns, keep your distance at first and move in gradually to a comfortable zone.⁠
⁠
💦Avoid dry environments. A humidifier in your home (in particular, by your bed) and where you work can help prevent nasal passages from drying out. Keep humidifiers clean and free of bacteria and mould.⁠
⁠
🛏️Sleep with your head elevated. Mucus pools in your sinuses at night when your head is down, so have your head propped up with pillows or a wedge during sleep.⁠
⁠
👃Be nice to your nose. Blow your nose gently, forceful blowing can irritate the nasal passages and propel bacteria-laden mucus back up into your sinuses.

If you've ever had a cold that just wouldn't go away, chances are it was sinusitis - an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, the cavities within the bones that surround the nose. ⁠

The sinuses are lined with a thin membrane that produces mucus, which is normally swept along by hair cells and drains through small openings into the nasal cavity. Sinusitis (also called rhinosinusitis) starts when this drainage system becomes blocked, usually from swelling due to inflammation caused by infection or allergy. Soon, your head hurts, you feel facial pressure or pain, and thick mucus clogs your nose. The symptoms may clear on their own, but often they persist or repeatedly return.⁠

There are many things you can do to reduce your chance of developing sinusitis or to relieve early sinusitis symptoms. 🤧⁠

One of the most important is to promote drainage and keep nasal passages clear. ⁠

Here are some suggestions:⁠

🛁Bathe your nasal passages daily. Run water gently into the nasal passages to help clear excess mucus and moisten membranes. Good times to do it are in the morning and at night⁠

💧Drink lots of water. Good hydration helps keep the mucus thin and loose. Have a bottle of water at your desk at work or put a glass near the kitchen sink to remind you to drink water throughout the day.⁠

🧖‍♀️Inhale steam. Linger in a hot shower. Or bring water to a boil and pour it into a pan; place a towel over your head, and carefully bend over the pan to inhale the steam. To avoid burns, keep your distance at first and move in gradually to a comfortable zone.⁠

💦Avoid dry environments. A humidifier in your home (in particular, by your bed) and where you work can help prevent nasal passages from drying out. Keep humidifiers clean and free of bacteria and mould.⁠

🛏️Sleep with your head elevated. Mucus pools in your sinuses at night when your head is down, so have your head propped up with pillows or a wedge during sleep.⁠

👃Be nice to your nose. Blow your nose gently, forceful blowing can irritate the nasal passages and propel bacteria-laden mucus back up into your sinuses.
...

Helping Children with Food Allergies Become Independent ~ with our wonderful naturopath and allergy advisor Rachel Balm. 
⁠
We all want our children to be able to go to school, camps and play dates without fear of a food reaction and possible death.⁠
⁠
We all know how strong peer pressure is and we don’t want our children to have their voices silenced because they are concerned with what their friends or classmates might think. ⁠
⁠
Here are some things you can teach your child to help them feel confident about communicating their food requirements to their friends, friends’ parents or restaurant staff.⁠
⁠
🗣️ Have your child practice their “food allergy script”⁠
For example, “I’m allergic to dairy and nuts. Does this food have dairy or nuts in it?”. Teach them to look someone in the eye and clearly and loud enough to be heard and say what they are allergic to.⁠
⁠
🤓 Teach them to read ingredient lists⁠ and what kinds of foods might contain “hidden” allergens⁠
⁠
🍽️Test the food before eating it⁠
With the exception of those children for whom even the least little exposure to a food particle will trigger a severe reaction, taking a small bite of food and waiting to see if they have any kind of reaction is a way of ensuring whether or not a dish is safe. For most children a good general rule of thumb is to take one little bite and wait 5 minutes to see if there’s a reaction.⁠
⁠
🙅‍♀️If in any doubt, don’t eat it!⁠
This will be hard for them sometimes because it may mean not joining in with eating the birthday cake at a party or even missing out on a dinner that has been prepared for them. This is likely going to happen to them many times over the course of their life and will be disappointing each time, but will get easier. ⁠
The bottom line is; it is better to be safe then have an allergic reaction.

Helping Children with Food Allergies Become Independent ~ with our wonderful naturopath and allergy advisor Rachel Balm.

We all want our children to be able to go to school, camps and play dates without fear of a food reaction and possible death.⁠

We all know how strong peer pressure is and we don’t want our children to have their voices silenced because they are concerned with what their friends or classmates might think. ⁠

Here are some things you can teach your child to help them feel confident about communicating their food requirements to their friends, friends’ parents or restaurant staff.⁠

🗣️ Have your child practice their “food allergy script”⁠
For example, “I’m allergic to dairy and nuts. Does this food have dairy or nuts in it?”. Teach them to look someone in the eye and clearly and loud enough to be heard and say what they are allergic to.⁠

🤓 Teach them to read ingredient lists⁠ and what kinds of foods might contain “hidden” allergens⁠

🍽️Test the food before eating it⁠
With the exception of those children for whom even the least little exposure to a food particle will trigger a severe reaction, taking a small bite of food and waiting to see if they have any kind of reaction is a way of ensuring whether or not a dish is safe. For most children a good general rule of thumb is to take one little bite and wait 5 minutes to see if there’s a reaction.⁠

🙅‍♀️If in any doubt, don’t eat it!⁠
This will be hard for them sometimes because it may mean not joining in with eating the birthday cake at a party or even missing out on a dinner that has been prepared for them. This is likely going to happen to them many times over the course of their life and will be disappointing each time, but will get easier. ⁠
The bottom line is; it is better to be safe then have an allergic reaction.
...

Severe food allergies can be stressful for a family and especially stressful for the children – those with allergies and those without – and it can be hard to make sure that neither the allergic child nor their non-allergic siblings feel singled out. ⁠
⁠
Depending on when the allergies start, as well as the birth order of your children, these problems can be mild, or they can be very troublesome.⁠
⁠
The difficulty with food allergies is that both the children with allergies and their non-allergic siblings can feel like it is not fair. This can cause friction among siblings if you can’t find techniques to address this early on in their lives.⁠
⁠
Supporting the Child with Allergies 💛⁠
⁠
There is a part of human nature that always wants what we can’t have and for the child with food allergies, the idea that they are missing out on the best tasting foods because of their allergies can be a potential concern for the future. The best ways to support your child with allergies is to make their special allergenic food seem like normal everyday food i.e if they have an allergy to dairy use alternative milks and non-dairy ice creams and research local restaurants and know which ones serve safe dishes. ⁠
⁠
Supporting the Child Who Doesn’t Have Allergies 💛⁠
⁠
It is important to encourage non-allergenic children to support their allergenic siblings. However, you don’t want them to feel like you are always accommodating the allergic child, and that if they didn’t have food allergies, their own food choices would be better. ⁠
⁠
Of course, it would be very unfair for your non-allergic child to miss out on the things their sibling is allergic to but it would be equally unfair to give one child a treat and exclude the other. ⁠
⁠
Here a few ways so your non allergic child doesn’t miss out:⁠
⁠
-put things in their lunchbox that they like ⁠
-take them out for special treats and to restaurants you can’t go to with the allergic child ⁠
-try to get them involved in shopping for, and cooking meals for their allergic sibling. They feel good about helping and therefore have fewer reasons for frustration or resentment.⁠
⁠
DM us with any questions you might have 💛⁠

Severe food allergies can be stressful for a family and especially stressful for the children – those with allergies and those without – and it can be hard to make sure that neither the allergic child nor their non-allergic siblings feel singled out. ⁠

Depending on when the allergies start, as well as the birth order of your children, these problems can be mild, or they can be very troublesome.⁠

The difficulty with food allergies is that both the children with allergies and their non-allergic siblings can feel like it is not fair. This can cause friction among siblings if you can’t find techniques to address this early on in their lives.⁠

Supporting the Child with Allergies 💛⁠

There is a part of human nature that always wants what we can’t have and for the child with food allergies, the idea that they are missing out on the best tasting foods because of their allergies can be a potential concern for the future. The best ways to support your child with allergies is to make their special allergenic food seem like normal everyday food i.e if they have an allergy to dairy use alternative milks and non-dairy ice creams and research local restaurants and know which ones serve safe dishes. ⁠

Supporting the Child Who Doesn’t Have Allergies 💛⁠

It is important to encourage non-allergenic children to support their allergenic siblings. However, you don’t want them to feel like you are always accommodating the allergic child, and that if they didn’t have food allergies, their own food choices would be better. ⁠

Of course, it would be very unfair for your non-allergic child to miss out on the things their sibling is allergic to but it would be equally unfair to give one child a treat and exclude the other. ⁠

Here a few ways so your non allergic child doesn’t miss out:⁠

-put things in their lunchbox that they like ⁠
-take them out for special treats and to restaurants you can’t go to with the allergic child ⁠
-try to get them involved in shopping for, and cooking meals for their allergic sibling. They feel good about helping and therefore have fewer reasons for frustration or resentment.⁠

DM us with any questions you might have 💛⁠
...

Do you think your baby is allergic to cow’s milk?⁠ 🐮🍼
⁠
When babies develop vomiting, diarrhea, and fussiness, some of them are diagnosed as having an allergy to cow’s milk protein. When that diagnosis is made, babies on formula have to switch to a specialised formula and the mothers of breastfeeding babies have to eliminate all dairy from their diets.⁠
⁠
The problem is that specialised formulas are very expensive and eliminating all dairy from your diet can be very difficult, leading some mothers to stop breastfeeding all together!⁠
⁠
There are two kinds of cow’s milk allergy. One of them is mediated through a type of immunoglobulin called IgE, which causes classic food allergy. This kind is easier to diagnose, as children have more classic symptoms of allergy such as rashes, facial swelling, or flushing. There are also blood tests that can help make the diagnosis.⁠
⁠
The other kind is not mediated through IgE and is tougher to diagnose with certainty. Babies with non-IgE mediated cow’s milk allergy can have various symptoms, such as vomiting, fussiness during or after feeding, diarrhea, or blood in the stool. The problem is that lots of babies without allergy can have vomiting, fussiness, or diarrhea and there are other reasons why babies might have blood in the stool. ⁠
⁠
The only way to definitively diagnose non-IgE mediated allergy is to eliminate all dairy, see if the baby gets better and then reintroduce dairy again and see if the symptoms come back. For lots of understandable reasons, many parents don’t want to do that reintroduction once a baby gets better, however the baby getting better may have nothing to do with the diet change.⁠
⁠
Do you want to clear up confusion on what your baby is exactly reacting?⁠
⁠
Please phone us on 9226 0561 and talk with one of our highly experienced practitioners. We can help and guide you through this process. 💛😊

Do you think your baby is allergic to cow’s milk?⁠ 🐮🍼

When babies develop vomiting, diarrhea, and fussiness, some of them are diagnosed as having an allergy to cow’s milk protein. When that diagnosis is made, babies on formula have to switch to a specialised formula and the mothers of breastfeeding babies have to eliminate all dairy from their diets.⁠

The problem is that specialised formulas are very expensive and eliminating all dairy from your diet can be very difficult, leading some mothers to stop breastfeeding all together!⁠

There are two kinds of cow’s milk allergy. One of them is mediated through a type of immunoglobulin called IgE, which causes classic food allergy. This kind is easier to diagnose, as children have more classic symptoms of allergy such as rashes, facial swelling, or flushing. There are also blood tests that can help make the diagnosis.⁠

The other kind is not mediated through IgE and is tougher to diagnose with certainty. Babies with non-IgE mediated cow’s milk allergy can have various symptoms, such as vomiting, fussiness during or after feeding, diarrhea, or blood in the stool. The problem is that lots of babies without allergy can have vomiting, fussiness, or diarrhea and there are other reasons why babies might have blood in the stool. ⁠

The only way to definitively diagnose non-IgE mediated allergy is to eliminate all dairy, see if the baby gets better and then reintroduce dairy again and see if the symptoms come back. For lots of understandable reasons, many parents don’t want to do that reintroduction once a baby gets better, however the baby getting better may have nothing to do with the diet change.⁠

Do you want to clear up confusion on what your baby is exactly reacting?⁠

Please phone us on 9226 0561 and talk with one of our highly experienced practitioners. We can help and guide you through this process. 💛😊
...

We’re in the thick of "Allergy Season" 🌼 🐝 but luckily, there are simple and natural ways, like changing your eating habits, that help treat and ease the pain of seasonal allergies. Brilliant!

There are also certain foods that can in fact make your seasonal allergies worse. Alcohol, peanuts, sugar, processed foods, wheat and chocolate to name a few.

Now, we aren’t saying eliminate all of these foods completely, just be mindful of your intake and how it may affect your seasonal allergies.

While the list of foods above may have you considering clearing out half your pantry, there are plenty of foods to say YES to this season! 

🌶️ Spicy Foods

If you’re suffering from congestion, incorporating spicy dishes like flavourful curry, can help thin out mucus. Cayenne pepper, garlic, ginger, and cinnamon are your culinary friends! Ginger helps break down toxins in your system and is a great sinus decongestant.

🥕 Fresh, Organic Vegetables

Getting your recommended intake of colourful vegetables and clean proteins is always recommended, but especially important during allergy season. Choose nutrient rich veggies like carrots, cabbage, beetroot, or swiss chard, which is high in Quercetin— a natural compound that fights hay fever and inflammation.

🍯 Local Raw Honey

A spoon full of local honey can help relieve watery eyes, congestion and most allergy symptoms because it contains the very pollen your seasonal allergies stem from.

🥬 Probiotic-Rich Foods

Sauerkraut, kimchi, and kombucha are probiotic-rich foods that increase energy levels, improve digestion and harbor immune boosting powers.

🥃 Liquids

Both bone broth and apple cider vinegar help break up mucus, ease respiratory issues, reduce inflammation, and boost immunity!

🍍 Pineapple

Amazing for fighting allergies! This delicious tropical fruit has some pretty amazing health benefits. It's rich in many antioxidants, such as vitamin C, and helps boost the immune system. Pineapple contains a digestive enzyme called bromelain which has powerful anti-inflammatory properties. The core contains the highest concentration of bromelain, so don't throw it out! The riper the fruit the softer the core will be.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

We’re in the thick of "Allergy Season" 🌼 🐝 but luckily, there are simple and natural ways, like changing your eating habits, that help treat and ease the pain of seasonal allergies. Brilliant!

There are also certain foods that can in fact make your seasonal allergies worse. Alcohol, peanuts, sugar, processed foods, wheat and chocolate to name a few.

Now, we aren’t saying eliminate all of these foods completely, just be mindful of your intake and how it may affect your seasonal allergies.

While the list of foods above may have you considering clearing out half your pantry, there are plenty of foods to say YES to this season!

🌶️ Spicy Foods

If you’re suffering from congestion, incorporating spicy dishes like flavourful curry, can help thin out mucus. Cayenne pepper, garlic, ginger, and cinnamon are your culinary friends! Ginger helps break down toxins in your system and is a great sinus decongestant.

🥕 Fresh, Organic Vegetables

Getting your recommended intake of colourful vegetables and clean proteins is always recommended, but especially important during allergy season. Choose nutrient rich veggies like carrots, cabbage, beetroot, or swiss chard, which is high in Quercetin— a natural compound that fights hay fever and inflammation.

🍯 Local Raw Honey

A spoon full of local honey can help relieve watery eyes, congestion and most allergy symptoms because it contains the very pollen your seasonal allergies stem from.

🥬 Probiotic-Rich Foods

Sauerkraut, kimchi, and kombucha are probiotic-rich foods that increase energy levels, improve digestion and harbor immune boosting powers.

🥃 Liquids

Both bone broth and apple cider vinegar help break up mucus, ease respiratory issues, reduce inflammation, and boost immunity!

🍍 Pineapple

Amazing for fighting allergies! This delicious tropical fruit has some pretty amazing health benefits. It's rich in many antioxidants, such as vitamin C, and helps boost the immune system. Pineapple contains a digestive enzyme called bromelain which has powerful anti-inflammatory properties. The core contains the highest concentration of bromelain, so don't throw it out! The riper the fruit the softer the core will be.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
...

Gluten Free / Dairy Free Blueberry Banana Muffins ⁠
and soooo easy to make! 🧁 💛⁠
⁠
INGREDIENTS⁠
-3 bananas, mashed ⁠
-2 eggs⁠
-1/4 cup olive oil⁠
-1/4 cup pure maple syrup⁠
-1 teaspoon vanilla extract⁠
-2 1/2 cups almond flour⁠
-1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder⁠
-1/4 teaspoon baking soda⁠
-1/4 teaspoon kosher salt⁠
-1 cup blueberries⁠
⁠
INSTRUCTIONS⁠
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a standard muffin pan with paper liners.⁠
⁠
2. Mash the banana in a large bowl. Add the eggs, oil, maple syrup and vanilla and whisk until well combined.⁠
⁠
3. Add the almond flour, then sprinkle the baking powder, baking soda and salt over the top. Whisk until well incorporated and no lumps remain, then gently fold in the blueberries.⁠
⁠
4. Divide the batter evenly between the muffin cups and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden brown and set. Remove from heat and place on a wire rack. Let stand 10 minutes, then remove from the pan and cool completely.⁠
⁠
Enjoy!

Gluten Free / Dairy Free Blueberry Banana Muffins ⁠
and soooo easy to make! 🧁 💛⁠

INGREDIENTS⁠
-3 bananas, mashed ⁠
-2 eggs⁠
-1/4 cup olive oil⁠
-1/4 cup pure maple syrup⁠
-1 teaspoon vanilla extract⁠
-2 1/2 cups almond flour⁠
-1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder⁠
-1/4 teaspoon baking soda⁠
-1/4 teaspoon kosher salt⁠
-1 cup blueberries⁠

INSTRUCTIONS⁠
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a standard muffin pan with paper liners.⁠

2. Mash the banana in a large bowl. Add the eggs, oil, maple syrup and vanilla and whisk until well combined.⁠

3. Add the almond flour, then sprinkle the baking powder, baking soda and salt over the top. Whisk until well incorporated and no lumps remain, then gently fold in the blueberries.⁠

4. Divide the batter evenly between the muffin cups and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden brown and set. Remove from heat and place on a wire rack. Let stand 10 minutes, then remove from the pan and cool completely.⁠

Enjoy!
...

Ahhhh Spring has arrived ...⁠
⁠
The birds ⁠🕊️⁠
and the bees⁠ 🐝⁠
the pollen⁠ 🌼⁠
⁠
But it's not just springtime pollen that can trigger a runny nose and itchy, watery eyes. Indoor allergens such as dust mites, cockroach parts, mould, and animal dander can lead to allergy symptoms in some people or make allergy symptoms worse. ⁠
⁠
Understanding the nature and location of indoor allergens is fundamental. The key to managing allergies that are caused by indoor allergens involves reducing your level of exposure to them or avoiding them entirely, if possible.⁠
⁠
Recommendations to help reduce indoor allergens;⁠
⁠
✅Sealing entry points for pests⁠
✅Keeping pets out of the bedroom⁠
✅Wash bedding each week in hot water⁠
✅Vacuum carpets and upholstered furniture⁠
⁠
Contact us to learn more about allergy testing and how we can support you through the season!⁠ 💛⁠

Ahhhh Spring has arrived ...⁠

The birds ⁠🕊️⁠
and the bees⁠ 🐝⁠
the pollen⁠ 🌼⁠

But it's not just springtime pollen that can trigger a runny nose and itchy, watery eyes. Indoor allergens such as dust mites, cockroach parts, mould, and animal dander can lead to allergy symptoms in some people or make allergy symptoms worse. ⁠

Understanding the nature and location of indoor allergens is fundamental. The key to managing allergies that are caused by indoor allergens involves reducing your level of exposure to them or avoiding them entirely, if possible.⁠

Recommendations to help reduce indoor allergens;⁠

✅Sealing entry points for pests⁠
✅Keeping pets out of the bedroom⁠
✅Wash bedding each week in hot water⁠
✅Vacuum carpets and upholstered furniture⁠

Contact us to learn more about allergy testing and how we can support you through the season!⁠ 💛⁠
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Manage your stress levels with Jowee - our wonderful clinical hypnotherapist ✨⁠
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Stress is constantly in our lives. Stress can stem from money worries or spiked by a sudden health scare. It can exact a toll upon you — physically, emotionally, and psychologically.⁠
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Stress is a fact of life, but you can determine how it affects your life. You can counteract the damaging effects of stress by calling upon your body’s rich potential for self-healing.⁠
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One way to reduce stress is to deep breath 🧘‍♀️⁠
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Deep breathing also goes by the names of diaphragmatic breathing, abdominal breathing, belly breathing, and paced respiration. It encourages full oxygen exchange — that is, the beneficial trade of incoming oxygen for outgoing carbon dioxide. Not surprisingly, it can slow the heartbeat and lower or stabilize blood pressure thus making you feel relaxed and clear headed. ⁠
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Whenever your stress level is rising, find a spot to slow down and inhale a few rounds of deep breathing. It also aids you in disengaging from distracting thoughts and sensations.

Manage your stress levels with Jowee - our wonderful clinical hypnotherapist ✨⁠

Stress is constantly in our lives. Stress can stem from money worries or spiked by a sudden health scare. It can exact a toll upon you — physically, emotionally, and psychologically.⁠

Stress is a fact of life, but you can determine how it affects your life. You can counteract the damaging effects of stress by calling upon your body’s rich potential for self-healing.⁠

One way to reduce stress is to deep breath 🧘‍♀️⁠

Deep breathing also goes by the names of diaphragmatic breathing, abdominal breathing, belly breathing, and paced respiration. It encourages full oxygen exchange — that is, the beneficial trade of incoming oxygen for outgoing carbon dioxide. Not surprisingly, it can slow the heartbeat and lower or stabilize blood pressure thus making you feel relaxed and clear headed. ⁠

Whenever your stress level is rising, find a spot to slow down and inhale a few rounds of deep breathing. It also aids you in disengaging from distracting thoughts and sensations.
...

Allergy season can be stressful business. Coping with watery eyes, a runny nose, sneezing, coughing, or a sore throat can affect how you get through each day. 🤧⁠
⁠
Not only can allergies cause stress, but stress can make allergies worse. If you're feeling stressed for any reason, you may find yourself dealing with worse allergy symptoms than usual.⁠
⁠
The stress response is the body's way of keeping you safe. When the brain senses danger, it alerts the adrenal glands to release stress hormones. This causes your heart to pound, blood pressure to rise, and blood vessels to constrict to send more blood to your brain and muscles. Stress makes your breath quicken to get oxygen to your muscles, and sends fat and sugar into the bloodstream to boost your energy.⁠
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The stress response is helpful in the short term as it enables us to get through a difficult situation. But if you trigger the stress response repeatedly, then over time it can contribute to depression, anxiety, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, heartburn, and many other health related problems including worse allergies.⁠
⁠
We spoke about useful tips to get on top of your hay fever in our previous post, however allergy management should also include strategies for stress reduction. ⁠
⁠
Stress reduction tips! 🧘‍♀️⁠
⁠
You can reduce stress with exercise — the kind that gets your heart and lungs pumping — and by eliciting the relaxation response, a well-studied physiological change that can help lower your blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate, oxygen consumption, adrenaline levels, and levels of the stress hormone cortisol.⁠
There are many ways to elicit the relaxation response, such as meditation, guided imagery, yoga, tai chi, and deep breathing exercises. ⁠
⁠
Stress reduction isn't the number one way to treat your allergies, but it may still be an important one.⁠
⁠
If you find this helpful, or know someone who needs to know this information tag them below, or DM us with any questions you might have 💛⁠

Allergy season can be stressful business. Coping with watery eyes, a runny nose, sneezing, coughing, or a sore throat can affect how you get through each day. 🤧⁠

Not only can allergies cause stress, but stress can make allergies worse. If you're feeling stressed for any reason, you may find yourself dealing with worse allergy symptoms than usual.⁠

The stress response is the body's way of keeping you safe. When the brain senses danger, it alerts the adrenal glands to release stress hormones. This causes your heart to pound, blood pressure to rise, and blood vessels to constrict to send more blood to your brain and muscles. Stress makes your breath quicken to get oxygen to your muscles, and sends fat and sugar into the bloodstream to boost your energy.⁠

The stress response is helpful in the short term as it enables us to get through a difficult situation. But if you trigger the stress response repeatedly, then over time it can contribute to depression, anxiety, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, heartburn, and many other health related problems including worse allergies.⁠

We spoke about useful tips to get on top of your hay fever in our previous post, however allergy management should also include strategies for stress reduction. ⁠

Stress reduction tips! 🧘‍♀️⁠

You can reduce stress with exercise — the kind that gets your heart and lungs pumping — and by eliciting the relaxation response, a well-studied physiological change that can help lower your blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate, oxygen consumption, adrenaline levels, and levels of the stress hormone cortisol.⁠
There are many ways to elicit the relaxation response, such as meditation, guided imagery, yoga, tai chi, and deep breathing exercises. ⁠

Stress reduction isn't the number one way to treat your allergies, but it may still be an important one.⁠

If you find this helpful, or know someone who needs to know this information tag them below, or DM us with any questions you might have 💛⁠
...